Category Archives: Films

Wednesday foreign film night: “Le Havre”

Wednesday FOREIGN FILM NIGHT   “LE HAVRE” 

 (2011 Finland/France)

An elderly shoeshine man stands up to officials pursuing an immigrant child in this contemporary fable. English Subtitles.

COME EARLY AT 7:15 PM TO SEE A REPEAT SHOW OF THE 12 MIN. FILM STARING BOB JORDAN, EMIL BERGES, AND PHIL HALE, DIRECTED BY CALLUM HALE THOMSON.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22

Library Learning Center, 7:30 p.m.

FREE   (Wednesday night series of movies from around the world.)

Foreign film night begins again!

Our foreign film night series begins again tomorrow night (Wednesday August 8) at the Library Learning Center with:

“The Women on the 6th Floor”  (2010 France).

A French businessman’s life is turned upside down when he discovers the world of Spanish maids living in his family’s building.  Comedy set in 1960’s Paris.  (English subtitles.)

Come join us at 7:30 p.m. This series is free and highlights movies from around the world.

In addition, we’ll have a bonus short feature to show beforehand: “Sandwich.” This short (12 min.) film is a story of mystery, suspense, and comedy. Filmed on Long Island, Maine, (although a British project), it stars the well-known Long Island actors, Bob Jordan, Emil Berges, and Philip Hale.

The film was written, directed, filmed, produced, and financed by young, award-winning Callum Hale Thomson of the Hale family, long-time summer residents.  The film has just been accepted for entry in a Chicago film festival this October.  Come and see a fine film and great acting!  FREE at the Long Island Learning Center at 7:30 p.m., before “The Women on the 6th floor.”

Pastries!

Okay, who here likes pastries? Well, after “sampling” two of the offerings in our library, both in film and book format, I decided that I like eating pastries more than making them.

In the documentary film, “Kings of Pastry,” French pastry chefs compete for the coveted Meilleurs Ouvriers de France award. The amazing sculptures they create are true artistry (although you wouldn’t be tempted to take a bite), and you will be on the edge of your seat as they carry the delicate and fragile looking concoctions from room to room. Definitely not for the faint of heart.

In Dalia Jurgensen’s “Spiced: a pastry chef’s true stories of trials by fire, after-hours exploits, and what really goes on in the kitchen,” you will also mostly realize what a lot of hard work it is to be a pastry chef. This somewhat racy memoir will leave you a bit tired and breathless.

So, at the end of the day, I’ll stick to my day job, and leave the pastry making to the experts. And as I reach for a napolean I will appreciate what it takes to make these confections, and relish every bite.

 

Escape to Paris – via films!

- not Paris, but almost!Ah, Spring in Paris – what everyone dreams of, at least I do. My friend Tifenn promises us that when we arrive at the airport she will greet us with croissants and pains au chocolat. But until that happy day arrives we can escape into films about Paris, including two that are at the Long Island Community Library: Hugo, and Midnight in Paris.

Hugo, a magical 3-D romp directed by Martin Scorsese, takes place in early 20th century Paris, specifically in the central train station. Based on the book, “The invention of Hugo Cabret” by Brian Selznick (also located at LICL), this movie will thrill you with the characters, story, and visual scenery.

Midnight in Paris, directed by Woody Allen, is a different kind of period piece, alternating between modern-day Paris and the Paris of the 1920s, populated with the literary characters of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and others.

So, unless you are lucky enough to escape to Paris any time soon, curling up with your croissants and pains au chocolat and these two movies will transport you into this other world, of Paris of almost 100 years ago.