Deck the Halls: Christmas ornaments and decorations made by Long Islanders

We are pleased to announce that our winter exhibit is installed – we are showcasing Christmas ornaments and decorations made by Long Islanders, past and present. The exhibit is in the library’s small glass case, and can be viewed during library hours. Come on down and see sheep, butterflies, a snowflake, snowmen, pinecones, Christmas trees, and other wonderful ornaments and decorations, made by our talented islanders.

christmas-ornament-exhibit-2christmas-ornament-exhibit

In celebration of tea … and books!

As the cool autumn wind blows over our island community, what better time than to curl up with a great book and a cup of tea? Several years ago I showcased my tea pot and tea cup collection at the Long Island Community Library, along with a list of some of my favorite tea books, which I will share below. What are some of your favorite books about tea?mhs-tea-party

The book of tea / preface by Anthony Burgess. Flammarion, 2005.

Barnes, Emilie. If teacups could talk : sharing a cup of kindness with treasured friends. Eugene, Oregon : Harvest House Publishers, 1994.

O’Connor, Sharon. Afternoon tea serenade : recipes from famous tea rooms, classical chamber music. Emeryville, Ca. : Menus and Music Productions, Inc., 1997.

Rubin, Ron. Tea Chings : the tea and herb companion : appreciating the varietals and virtues of fine tea and herbs / Ron Rubin and Stuart Avery Gold. New York : Newmarket Press, 2002.

Smith, Michael. The afternoon tea book. New York : Macmillan Publishing Company, 1986.

Siegal, Helene. The totally teatime cookbook / by Helen Siegal and Karen Gillingham. Berkeley, Ca. : Celestial Arts, 1995

Maine Historical Society book group is back again

designingacadia_webgraphicWednesday, October 5, 2016 – Wednesday, March 1, 2017

The Maine Historical Society Book Group is back by popular demand! Join us for five fun evenings of camaraderie and great book discussion. Led by MHS Research Librarian Tiffany Link, the group will read five books, each related to MHS’s Designing Acadia and World War I exhibitions, then gather for discussion. Light refreshments will be served. The group will meet in the MHS Brown Library, 6-8pm on the first Wednesday of each month through March. (There will be no December meeting.)

October 5:  A Land Of Discord Always-Acadia From It’s Beginnings to the Expulsion of Its People 1604-1755 by Charles Mahaffie (Camden, ME: Down East Books, 1995).

Please Read Chapters : 1- 4- 7- 11- 16- 21- 24- 29- 32 and 33 (or the whole book if you like). Also choose a chapter from Longfellow’s Evangeline to discuss and compare.

November 2: Ghost of Acadia by Marcus LiBrizzi (Rockport, ME: Down East Books, 2011).

January 4: Becoming Teddy Roosevelt by Andrew Vietze (Rockport, ME: Down East Books, 2010).

February 1: Love on the Rocks-Stories of Rusticators and Romance on MDI (Yarmouth, ME: Islandport Press, 2008).

March 1: Bar Harbor in the Roaring Twenties: From Village Life to the High Life on M.D.I. by Luann Yetter (The History Press, 2015).

Program dates: October 5, November 2, January 4, February 1, March 1. For questions, please contact Tiffany Link at tlink@mainehistory.org or 207-774-1822 x 230. A 20% discount on the books read for this group will be offered in the MHS Museum Store. $20 MHS Members; $30 general admission for all book sessions. Limited to 25 people.

Register today!

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe in Brunswick, Maine

Harriet Beecher Stowe houseThere’s a “new kid on the block” – that is, another historic house in Maine open to the public, and a literary site, too. The house where Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” can now be visited. Well, at least one of the rooms – “Harriet’s Writing Room” is a public exhibit space commemorating Stowe’s literary legacy. The home is a National Historic Landmark and a National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Site. Harriet also sheltered a slave in her home, John Andrew Jackson, while living in this house on Federal Street in Brunswick.

Harriet Beecher Stowe House sign

Why was Harriet Beecher Stowe in Brunswick? Her husband Calvin was a professor at Bowdoin College, his alma mater. They lived there only a short time – from 1850 to 1852 – but what a lot Harriet accomplished. Much of her over 500 page book was written there; a book which  which would soon become a classic, and would influence laying the groundwork of the Civil War. All while raising children and running a household (and sheltering slaves).

Harriet Beecher Stowe House interior

For more information: http://bowdoin.edu/stowe-house

Art & Soul 2016

We are pleased to announce that the Long Island Community Library’s 2016 fundraiser, Art & Soul, was a great success, thanks to all our generous library users and fans, who bought books, raffle tickets for baskets, artwork, and food. Special thanks to all the volunteers who made it happen, from schlepping books upstairs, to making baskets, to contributing art, to baking desserts. All was so appreciated! We made over $10,000, which will go so far in supporting the library. Thank you!

Art & Soul 2016 art auction

Art & Soul 2016 book sale Art & Soul 2016 food Art & Soul 2016 raffle basket

Famous men’s wives and lovers in literature

What do the wives and loves of Ernest Hemingway, Robert Louis Stevenson, Pablo Picasso, William Shakespeare, and Frank Lloyd Wright have in common? They all have recently appeared as the main characters in literary novels. Paula McLain’s “The Paris Wife” tells us the story of Ernest Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley. Nancy Horan’s “Under the wide and starry sky” portrays Fanny Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson’s wife. Another book by Horan, “Loving Frank” profiles Martha “Mamah” Borthwick’s relationship with Frank Lloyd Wright.  “Madame Picasso” by Anne Girard is about Eva Gouel, Picasso’s companion and a great muse in his artwork. Andrea Chapin’s “The Tutor” tells the story of a muse of Shakespeare.

No longer in the shadow, these women deserve to tell their side of the story, which is told through the imagination and research of the authors of these novels.Degas

American Writers Museum

Longfellow house and garden May 2015I am a big fan of literary sites – of course it helps that my office looks out onto the Longfellow Garden, behind the Wadsworth-Longfellow House, home of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, one of America’s most beloved poets. One of these days I want to travel the country, visiting literary homes and sites, reading and blogging about the literary works as I visit writer’s homes. But perhaps my first stop should be in Chicago at the American Writers Museum, which opens in 2017. The Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Garden is one of the affiliates.

The American Writers Museum Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) organization whose mission is to establish the first national museum in the United States dedicated to engaging the public in celebrating American writers and exploring their influence on our history, our identity, our culture and our daily lives.

Check it out! http://americanwritersmuseum.org/

 

Monroeville: the literary capital of Alabama and home to Nelle Harper Lee

By Lorinda VallsLorinda 4

It was a beautiful sunny Saturday driving thru Alabama, passing the cotton fields with their fluffy white flowers; much different from the snow I had left behind on Long Island, Maine. Our destination was Monroeville, Alabama, “The literary capital of Alabama” – proud to call itself that because of well-known , respected and all around good citizen Nelle Harper Lee, known for writing To Kill a Mockingbird and most recently Go Set a Watchman . She enjoyed her town, close friends family, community events, writing and golfing; what she didn’t like was all the Media, reporters, and questions that come from writing a best selling and controversial, to some, book. Her book was loosely based about Monroeville growing up with her brother and close friend Truman Capote and her visits to the Monroe County Court House to sit in the balcony at the courthouse and watch her father practice law. The themes of the book cover racial equality , rape, and childhood innocence.

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Nelle Harper Lee died at the age of 89 on the Friday that we were in Alabama. We were saddened by the news. It was only on our drive that we heard on the radio that she was to be buried Saturday in a private funeral ceremony. We wondered if the museum would be opened but we continued on our journey. While parking the car at the Monroe County Courthouse and Museum I noticed black bows on the Courthouse doors, flowers on the steps, and a few people dressed in black and, wouldn’t you know it, a reporter. Whatever was said between those in black and the reporter, it was quick and off she went. Probably “No Comment. ” I think Harper Lee would approve. We were able to get into the museum and and courthouse and see 2 permanent exhibits: Harper Lee : In her Own Words, and Truman Capote : A Childhood in Monroeville. Harper Lee and Truman Capote lived next door to each other as children and shared a love for reading and writing stories about people in their town. Our tour continued with a visit to the Courtroom. It is the model for the courtroom scene from To Kill a Mockingbird – completely set up with Judge’s bench, attorney’s tables, chairs, jury box and the view from balcony which gives you a bird’s eye view of the court house. I felt that for a minute I was with Harper Lee watching court in session. Moments later I was on the floor of the courtroom walking around, and as I approached the witness stand and judges bench there were flowers, a picture of Harper Lee, and a frame with a quote from To Kill a Mockingbird where Atticus says to Jem “It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin. But you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what You rarely win- but sometimes you do.” MS. LEE WON!! “She died clean as the mountain air. ” At 1:30 that afternoon on a Saturday at the Methodist church in Monroeville, AL, Nelle Harper Lee was buried with family and a few friends present and a world full of people bidding her farewell.

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Pilgrimages in literature

I’ve always loved the idea of a pilgrimage. Whether it’s a spiritual one, or just revisiting old childhood haunts, a pilgrimage is a journey of the heart, mind, and body.

Unlikely pilgrimageI’ve recently read two fictional pilgrimages. “The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry” by Rachel Joyce,  tells the story of Harold, who takes an unintentional pilgrimage to see his old friend Queenie, walking from his small town in Cornwall 600 miles north to the Scottish border. In “The Little Paris Bookshop” by Nina George, Jean Perdu, with little forethought but immersed in his grief for his beloved Manon, pushes his floating “book apothecary” (bookshop) into the waters of the Seine heading to Provence. Both books revolve around men who have allowed themselves to not fully enjoy life because of tragedy, and each book finds the men rediscovering love, often which was right at home. In the meantime, they pick up characters along the way who help them to navigate the matters of the heart.Little paris bookshop

One of my favorite non-fiction books about pilgrimages is Rosemary Mahoney’s “The Singular Pilgrim: Travels on Sacred Ground.” In this beautifully written and lyrical book, Mahoney undertakes six pilgrimages: visiting an Anglican shrine to Saint Mary in Walsingham, England; walking the five-hundred-mile Camino de Santiago in Northern Spain; braving the icy bathwater at Lourdes; rowing alone across the Sea of Galilee to spend a night camped below the Golan Heights; viewing Varanasi, India’s holiest city, from a rubber raft on the Ganges; soldiering barefoot through the three-day penitential Catholic pilgrimage, known as Saint Patrick’s Purgatory, on Ireland’s Station Island. We can all live vicariously through her adventures, until the time comes for us to make any of these pilgrimages ourselves, if we so choose.Singular pilgrim

Finally, in this season of Lent, I’m enjoying “Pilgrim Road: A Benedictine Journey through Lent,” by Albert Holtz. Holtz, a Benedictine monk from Newark, New Jersey, was given a sabbatical year in which he traveled throughout fifteen countries, mostly in Europe. This book is based on the journal he kept during his travels. Holtz intertwines stories from his journeys with lessons for life.Pilgrim Road

 

Bunny Hop Tales: Tales from the Bunny Hop Road

Bunny HopBunnies are a folkloric figure and symbol of Easter, as well as of spring. Here on Long Island bunnies abound on the Bunny Hop Road. This is our tribute to the Bunny Hop Road, through photographs of some of our favorite bunnies, along with bunnies from the collections of Ann Caliandro, Penny Murley, and Meredith Sweet, and bunnies featured in books from the Long Island Community Library.

We welcome your stories about the Bunny Hop Road!

Curated by Erin Love and Nancy Noble

Long Island Community Library, Winter-Spring 2016

A small library on an island on the coast of Maine